The Suzuki Method

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Dr. Shinichi Suzuki
Dr. Shinichi Suzuki

Originally founded by Dr. Shinichi Suzuki in Japan in the 1940s, the Suzuki approach has spread worldwide and is recognized as a major force in music education today.  The approach focuses on developing the whole child through music.  The aim is to nurture creativity, sensitivity and self-esteem and to help children “become better human beings and create a better world.”  Dr. Suzuki has said “The potential of every child is unlimited” and “any child who is properly trained can develop musical ability just as all children develop the ability to speak their mother tongue.”

The environment for this development is a synergistic triangle of parent—child—teacher, which nurtures music growth through a process of loving—listening—leading—learning.  Each participant in the triangle has a unique role and responsibility to ensure overall success.  The purpose of Suzuki training is to help every child to experience the joy that comes through making music.  Through the Suzuki growing process, children thrive in a total environment of support.  They develop confidence and self-esteem, a determination to try difficult things, and self-discipline and concentration, as well as a lasting enjoyment of music and the sensitivity and skill for making music.

Dr. Suzuki’s main goals are “for the child to build a noble soul, to develop an appreciation of beauty, to give a sense of purpose to life, to learn the discipline of acquiring a skill and to become a fine human being.”

—from the SuzukiMusic website at http://suzukimusic.ca/

For More Information:

http://www.actx.edu/music/files/filecabinet/folder5/s_Philosophy.doc
A paper outlining the basic tenents of the Suzuki Philosophy.


The Suzuki Association of the Americas
The Suzuki Association of the Americas (SAA) is a coalition of teachers, parents, educators, and others who are interested in making music education available to all children. The SAA provides programs and services to members throughout North and South America. With the International Suzuki Association (ISA) and other regional associations, the SAA promotes and supports the spread of Dr. Suzuki's Talent Education.



The Mother Tongue Approach


How we learn language
How students study music by the Suzuki Method
1. Expectation of Success
All children can learn to speak their mother tongue.
1. Expectation of Success
All children can learn to play music
2. Early Beginning
Parents encourage children to learn to use language from a very young age.
2. Early Beginning
Suzuki children usually begin to play music when they are between 3-5 years old.
3. Listening
Surrounded by speech from the day of birth, children listen for about two years before starting to speak in sentences.
3. Listening
Suzuki students listen every day to recordings of the repertoire they are going to study many months before they begin study.
4. Nurturing
Parents always greet gurgling, babbling and first words with enthusiasm and joy.
4. Nurturing
Suzuki parents always encourage their children’s musical efforts
5. Social Environment
Children learn language within their family and with friends outside the home.
5. Social Environment
Suzuki students learn to play music in weekly private lessons and regular group classes.
6. Parent Teacher
Parents involve themselves deeply in teaching language skills to their young children.
6. Parent Teacher
Suzuki parents are ‘home teachers.’ They help the child during daily their practice.
7. Repetition
Children repeat new words that they are learning many, many times.
7. Repetition
Suzuki students repeat new skills many times until they master them.
8. Performance
Parents proudly display their child's linguistic achievements from the very beginning - even a goo-goo is good.
8. Performance
Suzuki students perform a lot in group lessons and recitals. Their first performance may be a simple bow or song.
9. Review
Children continue to use the same words that they acquired as an infant – words remain in their vocabulary.
9. Review
Suzuki students continue to play their early pieces, using them as the foundation for technical studies and to advance through the repertoire.
10. Natural Reading
Children only learn to read several years after learning to speak – until this stage, they "learn by ear" all new vocabulary and grammar.
10. Natural Reading
Suzuki students learn to read music around 6years old when they have learned to play by ear.
 

 



Created By David White -- Mar/27/07
Last updated by Administrator -- Jul/11/14

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Sep 23

Solo Recital #1

07:00 PM - 08:30 PM, September 23, 2014

Oak Acorn Room, College Union Building 2nd floor

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"Perhaps it is music that will save the world."

- the great cellist, Pablo Casals, upon hearing a group of Suzuki students perform.